ScienceDaily: Earth & Climate News

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ScienceDaily: Earth & Climate News

The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease Squid could thrive under climate change Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, research reveals Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility Bitcoin causing carbon dioxide emissions comparable to Las Vegas or Hamburg Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air Interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet Selective logging will not be enough to sustain timber production in Amazonia Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites

The surprising reason why some lemurs may be more sensitive to forest loss

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Researchers compared the gut microbes of 12 lemur species across the island of Madagascar, where thousands of acres of forest are cleared each year. The team found that some lemurs harbor microbes that are more specialized than others for the forests where they live.

Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Chemists have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials.

Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes -- which include mammals, reptiles, and birds -- can have webbed digits. Scientists now show that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric oxygen, which triggers removal of interdigital webbing.

Early-season hurricanes result in greater transmission of mosquito-borne infectious disease

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 10:37 AM PDT

The timing of a hurricane is one of the primary factors influencing its impact on the spread of mosquito-borne infectious diseases such as West Nile Virus, dengue, chikungunya and Zika, according to new research.

Squid could thrive under climate change

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:37 AM PDT

When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to carbon dioxide levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results.

Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, research reveals

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT

New research suggests most of Earth's heavy metals were spewed from a largely overlooked kind of star explosion called a collapsar.

Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT

New research suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants.

Bitcoin causing carbon dioxide emissions comparable to Las Vegas or Hamburg

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:45 AM PDT

The use of Bitcoin causes around 22 megatons in carbon dioxide emissions annually -- comparable to the total emissions of cities such as Las Vegas or Hamburg.

Carbon-neutral fuel made from sunlight and air

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:31 AM PDT

Researchers have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions.

Interactions between plant and insect-infecting viruses

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:31 AM PDT

Aphids and the plant viruses they transmit cause billions of dollars in crop damage every year. Researchers are examining this relationship at the molecular level, which could lead to new methods for controlling the pests. The researchers uncovered what may be the first example of cooperation between a plant virus and an insect virus to increase their likelihood to spread.

Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.

Warming waters in western tropical Pacific may affect West Antarctic Ice Sheet

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Warming waters in the western tropical Pacific Ocean have significantly increased thunderstorms and rainfall, which may affect the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and global sea-level rise, according to a new tudy.

Selective logging will not be enough to sustain timber production in Amazonia

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Amazonian forests are unlikely to provide enough timber to meet current demand over the long term, even with the use of improved logging practices. That is a key finding of a new study.

Breathing new life into dye-sensitized solar cells

Posted: 12 Jun 2019 03:11 PM PDT

Researchers are poised to reboot the field of aromatic-fused porphyrin sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells, the most efficient solar efficient solar technology available at present.

Rising sea levels destroyed evidence of shell middens at many prehistoric coastal sites

Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:14 AM PDT

In a new study, researchers confirm a theory from the 1970s that coastal hunter-gatherers processed much of their shellfish at the beach before returning with their meat to camps on higher ground, leaving the heavy shells by the water. This finding has dramatic implications for past analyses of hunter-gatherer diets -- because many beachside shell middens would now be destroyed or underwater due to past sea level rises since the last Ice Age.

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