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ScienceDaily: Living Well News


Some video games are good for older adults' brains
Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension
What makes a happy working mom?
City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's
Is laughter the greatest medicine for cancer patients?
Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens
Want to listen better? Lend a right ear
Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes, study suggests
Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor?
Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn experts
Six genes driving peanut allergy reactions identified


Some video games are good for older adults' brains



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Playing 3D-platform video games on a regular basis may improve cognitive functions in seniors and increase grey matter in a brain structure called the hippocampus, a new study suggests.


Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


People who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading.


What makes a happy working mom?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother.


City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:19 AM PST


Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in older adults, according to new research.


Is laughter the greatest medicine for cancer patients?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:18 AM PST


Spontaneous humor is used and appreciated by people with cancer and can be a helpful way of dealing with distressing, taboo or embarrassing circumstances, research shows.


Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Chronic sleep deprivation -- which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school -- has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental health risks: new research finds that for teenagers, even a short period of sleep restriction could, over the long-term, raise their risk for depression and addiction.


Want to listen better? Lend a right ear



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Listening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they hear.


Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes, study suggests



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:05 AM PST


Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes.


Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor?



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Electronic fetal monitoring is often used during labor to detect unborn babies at risk of brain damage (neonatal encephalopathy) from a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). In the UK, continuous monitoring is used only for women in high-risk labor, but should it be used for all women in labor?


Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn experts



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Air pollution from road traffic is having a detrimental impact upon babies' health in London, before they are born, finds a study.


Six genes driving peanut allergy reactions identified



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 06:21 AM PST


Six genes that activate hundreds of other genes in children experiencing severe allergic reactions to peanuts have now been identified by researchers. This is the first study in human trials to identify genes driving acute peanut allergic reactions using a double-blind placebo-controlled approach with comprehensive sequencing of genes expressed before, during, and after they ingested peanut.
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