ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'
Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
Protecting rare species can benefit human life
Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types
Brain's insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain
How we make complex decisions
Flexibility of working memory from random connections
Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults
Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health
Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins
These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership
Key step in cell protein production
Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene
First gene that increases the risk of fainting identified
People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes
Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning
Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early
Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms
Research links civic engagement to resilience
Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice
How our current thinking can sway our memories of love
Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life
How a new father views his relationship with his partner
A new treatment for stroke in mice reduces brain damage and promotes motor recovery


Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'



Posted: 16 May 2019 03:59 PM PDT


Researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.'


Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not



Posted: 16 May 2019 02:00 PM PDT


Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to new research.


Protecting rare species can benefit human life



Posted: 16 May 2019 12:53 PM PDT


Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. To better protect rare animals, insects and plants, and to prepare for an uncertain future influenced by climate change, a team of researchers is aiming to merge this conventional wisdom with a new way of thinking: arguing researchers needs to better understand how rare species benefit people outside of their existence value.


Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:29 AM PDT


Changes in gene activity in specific brain cells are associated with the severity of autism in children and young adults with the disorder, according to a new study.


Brain's insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Neuroscientists have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events.


How we make complex decisions



Posted: 16 May 2019 11:28 AM PDT


Neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. The study sheds light on how the brain reasons about probable causes of failure after a hierarchy of decisions.


Flexibility of working memory from random connections



Posted: 16 May 2019 10:56 AM PDT


Working memory is your ability to hold things 'in mind.' It acts as a workspace in which information can be held, manipulated, and used to guide behavior. It plays a critical role in cognition, decoupling behavior from the immediate sensory world. One remarkable thing about working memory is its flexibility -- you can hold anything in mind. In their new manuscript, researchers present the first model of working memory that captures this flexibility.


Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults.


Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts.


Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:46 AM PDT


Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found. Not only do blooms routinely occur in this area, which previously was not thought to be an area of concern, they can also produce types of cyanobacterial toxins that aren't typically detected through routine water-safety monitoring, according to a new study.


These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.


Key step in cell protein production



Posted: 16 May 2019 08:45 AM PDT


Scientists have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.


Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


As many as 90 percent of individuals who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD) choose not to take a gene test that reveals if they will also develop the fatal disorder -- and a new study details the reasons why. Understanding the ''why'' matters as new clinical trials testing therapies for people who haven't yet developed symptoms of Huntington disease requires participants to be tested for the HD gene to be included in the trials.


First gene that increases the risk of fainting identified



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. Based on data from more than 400,000 individuals they have identified the first gene that predisposes to fainting.


People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.


Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:37 AM PDT


A team of researchers has developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.


Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


More than one in four patients with schizophrenia and epilepsy die before reaching the age of fifty.


Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


The results of the studyshow that significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function can persist for months, or even years, following concussion.


Research links civic engagement to resilience



Posted: 16 May 2019 07:14 AM PDT


Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.


Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice



Posted: 16 May 2019 06:08 AM PDT


Researchers have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.


How our current thinking can sway our memories of love



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:24 AM PDT


As our memories fade, we rely on our current assessment of a person to remember how we felt about them in the past, and new research suggests this extends to some of the most central figures in our lives: our parents.


Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life



Posted: 16 May 2019 05:23 AM PDT


Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date.


How a new father views his relationship with his partner



Posted: 15 May 2019 01:54 PM PDT


A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.


A new treatment for stroke in mice reduces brain damage and promotes motor recovery



Posted: 13 May 2019 12:56 PM PDT


New research shows that brain fluids can be normalized with adrenergic receptor antagonists, a combination of drugs to block the activity of (nor)adrenaline in the brain. This experimental treatment for stroke aided motor recovery and reduced cell death in mice, scientists report.
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