ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News

5 maanden geleden


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News


Shocking study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activities
Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change
More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response
Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?
Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect clues
New Zealand has its own population of blue whales
Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
Photosynthesis involves a protein 'piston'
After 60 years, Isle Royale continues world's longest predator-prey study
Faster test for cannabis quality
La Trobe's infection-busting discovery
The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cycles
Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart health
Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of years
Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South
Climate-threatened animals unable to relocate
Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???
Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target joints
Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia


Shocking study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activities



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


A shocking study confirms that one third of the world's protected areas -- an astonishing 2.3 million square miles or twice the size of the state of Alaska - are now under intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanization.


Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


New research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change. Species across the globe would benefit -- particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia. Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros. Reducing the risk to insects is important because they are vital for 'ecosystem services' such as pollinating crops and being part of the food chain.


More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


Mosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system.


Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:26 AM PDT


What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution.


Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect clues



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Researchers have made a surprise discovery that could rewrite our understanding of the role programmed cell death plays in embryonic development and congenital birth defects. The team showed that, while programmed cell death -- or apoptosis -- is essential for healthy development overall, many organs and tissues do not require apoptosis to develop normally. The study also suggested that abnormalities in cell death processes are likely to contribute to some common birth defects in humans, such as spina bifida, heart vessel defects and cleft palate.


New Zealand has its own population of blue whales



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


A group of blue whales that frequent the South Taranaki Bight (STB) between the North and South islands of New Zealand appears to be part of a local population that is genetically distinct from other blue whales in the Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean, a new study has found.


Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


A new study examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago.


Photosynthesis involves a protein 'piston'



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


The photosystem I (PSI)-ferrodoxin (Fd) complex is important in electron transfer during photosynthesis, through which plants convert sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water into complex chemicals and oxygen. Scientists have recently crystallized the PSI-Fd complex for the first time. They found that the PSI-Fd complex contained Fd with weak and strong binding states and that Fd binding caused the PSI subunits to reorganize into a structure that facilitated rapid electron transfer.


After 60 years, Isle Royale continues world's longest predator-prey study



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


The 2018 report is out: two wolves, almost 1,500 moose and an ecosystem in transition. In its 60th year, the research conducted at Isle Royale National Park is the longest running predator-prey study of its kind.


Faster test for cannabis quality



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


Researchers have developed a new method of measuring phytocannabinoids -- the primary bioactive molecules in cannabis -- that will lead to faster, safer and more accurate information for producers, regulators and consumers alike.


La Trobe's infection-busting discovery



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


Scientists have shown a protein found in a tobacco plant has the potential to fight life-threatening infectious diseases.


The survival of sea birds affected by ocean cycles



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


In a general context of climate change, researchers have revealed the impact of ocean cycles, such as the Pacific decadal oscillation and El Niño, on the survival of the Nazca booby. Their research shows for the first time that long cycles directly affect the survival of adult populations.


Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart health



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


A new scientific advisory reaffirms the recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week.


Marine animals have been following their preferred climate for millions of years



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


Current global warming has far-reaching ecological consequences, also for the Earth's oceans. Many marine organisms are reacting by migrating towards the poles. Researchers have now discovered that marine animals have been migrating for millions of years when the temperature on Earth increases or decreases.


Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought.


Climate-threatened animals unable to relocate



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


Many of the European mammals whose habitat is being destroyed by climate change are not able to find new places to live elsewhere.


Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???



Posted: 16 May 2018 02:22 PM PDT


A team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec's national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They calculated potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected areas in southern Quebec. Their results suggest that fifty -- eighty years from now (between 2071-2100) close to half of the protected regions of southern Quebec may see a species turnover of greater than 80 %.


Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target joints



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Scientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses.


Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


A new study shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.
You are subscribed to email updates from Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categorieën: Wetenschap
Leeftijd: 14 t/m 18 jaar 19 t/m 30 jaar 31 t/m 64 jaar 65 jaar en ouder

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2018