ScienceDaily: Science & Society News

8 dagen geleden


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Science & Society News


Exploring a world without food animals
More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate
United States has lost dominance in highly intense, ultrafast laser technology to Europe and Asia, new report finds
Psychosis incidence highly variable internationally
New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient
Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis
Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environments
Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success
What gave early New Orleans jazz clarinets their unique sound?
New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids
Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution
Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands, study suggests
Sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact, study shows


Exploring a world without food animals



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:22 PM PST


What would happen if U.S. farmers stopped producing animals for food and Americans went vegan? Some have called for a move in that direction to address increasing concerns about U.S. health, eating habits, and climate change. Researchers recently explored those questions and found surprising results.


More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


The climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate, according to a article. Their findings suggest that the models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, on average, may be underestimating future warming.


United States has lost dominance in highly intense, ultrafast laser technology to Europe and Asia, new report finds



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:26 AM PST


The U.S. is losing ground in a second laser revolution of highly intense, ultrafast lasers that have broad applications in manufacturing, medicine, and national security, says a new report. Currently, 80 percent to 90 percent of the high-intensity laser systems are overseas, and all of the highest power research lasers currently in construction or already built are overseas as well.


Psychosis incidence highly variable internationally



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Rates of psychosis can be close to eight times higher in some regions compared to others, finds a new study.


New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:07 AM PST


Previous studies about nurse workflow have used time-motion study methods, which involve manually observing nurses in person or on video and then clocking how much time they spend on each task. Now, an engineer has developed a method for better tracking how nurses in an intensive care unit (ICU) spend their workday. Findings could help improve the health care delivery process in the ICU and could also be applied to other health care procedures.


Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


In the US alone, more than 2 million people struggle with opioid use disorders. Opioids, often prescribed as pain medications, have now become the country's leading cause of drug overdose. But scientists are identifying ways to help combat the epidemic, which include getting people treatment faster, developing safer opioids, and helping patients choose appropriate treatment.


Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environments



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Spending a night in the hospital is not only stressful, but also loud. The constant beeps, whirrs and alarms ascend to a cacophony that produces anything but a relaxing, restful environment. Researchers summarize the limited number of studies available on hospital noise and discuss the different approaches health care facilities are taking to bring restful repose to patients across the country.


Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


The acoustics of political speech are known to be a powerful influencer of voter preferences, but vocal disorders can change the qualities of a person's speech, and voice scientists have found that this alters politicians' perceived charisma.


What gave early New Orleans jazz clarinets their unique sound?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


The hauntingly beautiful 'wailing' sounds of early New Orleans jazz clarinets, often featured in brass bands or jazz funerals, are one of the most distinctive instrument styles in American music. The unique sound begs the question: what's behind incredible their range of sound and tonal variety?


New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors -- and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from an overdose.


Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant.


Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands, study suggests



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research.


Sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact, study shows



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 02:02 PM PST


Researchers have revisited workplace sexual harassment issues after the initial study was done nearly 20 years ago.
You are subscribed to email updates from Science & Society News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categorieën: Wetenschap
Leeftijd: 14 t/m 18 jaar 19 t/m 30 jaar 31 t/m 64 jaar 65 jaar en ouder

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2017