ScienceDaily: Strange Science News

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ScienceDaily: Strange Science News


Seeing through walls of unknown materials
3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function
DNA-origami surpasses important thresholds
Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath
Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solved
The world's smallest Mona Lisa
A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key to curing cirrhosis
Turning beer into fuel
Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharks
Microwaved exploding eggs make for an unusual acoustic experiment
Want to listen better? Lend a right ear


Seeing through walls of unknown materials



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Researchers have devised a way to see through walls without any advance knowledge of what the walls are made out of. Besides having obvious applications in the realm of security, the approach could lead to inexpensive devices to help construction workers easily locate conduits, pipes and wires.


3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Hospitals are making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly.


DNA-origami surpasses important thresholds



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


It is the double strands of our genes that make them so strong. Using a technique known as DNA origami, biophysicists have been building nanometer-scale objects for several years. Now scientists have not only broken out of the nanometer realm to build larger objects, but have also cut the production costs a thousand-fold. These innovations open a whole new frontier for the technology.


Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


New research suggests that the bulk of clay minerals on Mars could have been formed as the planet's crust cooled and solidified, not by later interactions with water on the surface as has long been assumed.


Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solved



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


Scientists have discovered that microbes in Antarctica have a previously unknown ability to scavenge hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the air to stay alive in the extreme conditions. The find has implications for the search for life on other planets, suggesting extraterrestrial microbes could also rely on trace atmospheric gases for survival.


The world's smallest Mona Lisa



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:20 AM PST


New techniques in DNA self-assembly allow researchers to create the largest to-date customizable patterns with nanometer precision on a budget.


A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key to curing cirrhosis



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:26 AM PST


The unique liver function of a South American amphibian, Siphonops annulatus, could pave the way to finding a cure to the devastating liver condition cirrhosis, according to a new study.


Turning beer into fuel



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


Chemists have made the first steps towards making sustainable fuel using beer as a key ingredient, outlines a new report.


Stress test: New study finds seals are stressed-out by sharks



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


While a little added stress may be helpful to flee a dangerous situation, or to meet an approaching deadline, it's no secret that prolonged exposure to the stress hormone cortisol is linked to health problems. So, what effects does stress have on animals in the wild that need to navigate the same waters as the ocean's top predator -- great white sharks?


Microwaved exploding eggs make for an unusual acoustic experiment



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


If you have looked closely at a microwave's warnings or have experienced an accidental explosion, you know that certain foods pose a risk due to an increase in their internal pressure, and potatoes and hard-boiled eggs are among the most common culprits. Researchers are presenting new findings on the sound pressures generated by exploding eggs.


Want to listen better? Lend a right ear



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Listening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they hear.
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