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ScienceDaily: Strange Science News

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act Squid could thrive under climate change Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, research reveals Bitcoin causing carbon dioxide emissions comparable to Las Vegas or Hamburg Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, study reveals Making the 'human-body Internet' more effective New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia

Mysterious Majorana quasiparticle is now closer to being controlled for quantum computing

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Using a new approach, researchers detected the elusive Majorana quasiparticle, notable for being its own antiparticle and for its potential as the basis for a robust quantum computing system, in a device built from a superconductor, small magnetic elements, and a topological insulator.

Environmental oxygen triggers loss of webbed digits

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Free fingers have many obvious advantages on land, such as in locomotion and grasping, while webbed fingers are typical of aquatic or gliding animals. But both amphibians and amniotes -- which include mammals, reptiles, and birds -- can have webbed digits. Scientists now show that during embryo development, some animal species detect the presence of atmospheric oxygen, which triggers removal of interdigital webbing.

Viruses found to use intricate 'treadmill' to move cargo across bacterial cells

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT

Using advanced technologies to explore the inner workings of bacteria, biologists have provided the first example of cargo within bacteriophage cells transiting along treadmill-like structures. The discovery demonstrates that bacteria have more in common with sophisticated human cells than previously believed.

Once thought to be asexual, single-celled parasites caught in the act

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 10:37 AM PDT

The single-celled parasite Leishmania can reproduce sexually, according to new research. The finding could pave the way towards finding genes that help the parasite cause disease.

Squid could thrive under climate change

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:37 AM PDT

When scientists subjected two-toned pygmy squid and bigfin reef squid to carbon dioxide levels projected for the end of the century, they received some surprising results.

Earth's heavy metals result of supernova explosion, research reveals

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT

New research suggests most of Earth's heavy metals were spewed from a largely overlooked kind of star explosion called a collapsar.

Bitcoin causing carbon dioxide emissions comparable to Las Vegas or Hamburg

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:45 AM PDT

The use of Bitcoin causes around 22 megatons in carbon dioxide emissions annually -- comparable to the total emissions of cities such as Las Vegas or Hamburg.

Zebras' stripes could be used to control their temperature, study reveals

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:31 AM PDT

New research indicates that zebras' stripes are used to control body temperature after all -- and reveals for the first time a new mechanism for how this may be achieved.

Making the 'human-body Internet' more effective

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Human body communication (HBC) uses the human body to transmit power and data, much like the internet. Because it's a smaller and closed network, it has the benefit of being more secure and power efficient. In a recent study, a group of Japanese researchers used an equivalent circuit model to examine how different parameters affect HBC transmission characteristics.

New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:51 AM PDT

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia.

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