ScienceDaily: Top Health News

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ScienceDaily: Top Health News


Routing gene therapy directly into brain
Parents' reports of children's autism symptoms differ by ethnicity
3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function
Combating eye injuries with a reversible superglue seal
Novel regulation of gene expression in brain tumors identified
When a common cold may trigger early supportive care
Some video games are good for older adults' brains
Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension
CLOCK gene may hold answers to human brain evolution
Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's
Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa
Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models
A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key to curing cirrhosis
High prevalence of bacteria that carry gene mcr-1 in ecosystem, study shows
What's that smell? The advantage of sniffing
Psychosis incidence highly variable internationally
Abnormal electrocardiogram findings are common in NBA players
Alzheimer's damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE gene
New method helps identify causal mechanisms in depression
What makes a happy working mom?
Humans at maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, study suggests
Go with the flow (or against it)
Marshmallow-like silicone gels used as insulation in containers for cryopreserved embryos
Dibenzoazepine defender: Drug found to be effective against resistant hepatitis C
How ribosomes shape the proteome
Exposure to wildfire smoke in utero lowers birthweight
Youth who experience violent victimization seek intimate relationships at an earlier age
City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's
Is laughter the greatest medicine for cancer patients?
New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient
First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria
Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis
Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environments
Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success
Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens
New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids
US and Norwegian trials compare treatment options for opioid dependence
Want to listen better? Lend a right ear
'Green' cataract surgery model drastically reduces environmental footprint
Brain activity and anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder
Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes, study suggests
Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor?
Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands, study suggests
Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn experts
Blood test could help predict skin cancer's return
Sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact, study shows
Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds
In multiple myeloma, high levels of enzyme ADAR1 are associated with reduced survival
New weakness found in most common childhood malignant brain tumor


Routing gene therapy directly into brain



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 02:42 PM PST


A new technique, which could be used to transplant donor-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or a patient's own genetically-engineered HSCs into the brain, has been revealed by scientists in a new report.


Parents' reports of children's autism symptoms differ by ethnicity



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Racial differences in parents' reports of concerns about their child's development to healthcare providers may contribute to delayed diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in black children, according to a study.


3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Hospitals are making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly.


Combating eye injuries with a reversible superglue seal



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:24 AM PST


Scientists and engineers have developed a reversible, on-the-spot, temperature-sensitive gel that could seal eye injuries on the battlefield.


Novel regulation of gene expression in brain tumors identified



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:23 AM PST


New study results reveal a previously unknown interplay between two key enzymes and a novel understanding of how brain cancer tumors form and spread.


When a common cold may trigger early supportive care



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


A new study shows that in infants who were born severely premature, human rhinovirus infections appear to trigger airway hyper-reactivity, which leads to wheezing, hyperinflation and more severe respiratory disease.


Some video games are good for older adults' brains



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Playing 3D-platform video games on a regular basis may improve cognitive functions in seniors and increase grey matter in a brain structure called the hippocampus, a new study suggests.


Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


People who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading.


CLOCK gene may hold answers to human brain evolution



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


A gene controlling our biological clocks plays a vital role in regulating human-specific genes important to brain evolution. These findings open new paths of research into how CLOCK proteins produced by the CLOCK gene affect brain function and the processes by which neurons find their proper place in the brain.


Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:25 AM PST


Using a bioinformatics and experimental approach, scientists have found that rendering mitochondria resistant to damage can halt diseases caused by amyloid toxicity, such as Alzheimer's disease.


Deadly cryptococcal fungi found in public spaces in South Africa



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:20 AM PST


Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii have been found large numbers on trees in South Africa.


Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:26 AM PST


A team of researchers has 3-D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.


A South American amphibian could potentially hold the key to curing cirrhosis



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:26 AM PST


The unique liver function of a South American amphibian, Siphonops annulatus, could pave the way to finding a cure to the devastating liver condition cirrhosis, according to a new study.


High prevalence of bacteria that carry gene mcr-1 in ecosystem, study shows



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Bacteria that carry the colistin resistance gene mcr-1 commonly exist in human and various types of food and environmental samples collected from Hong Kong and the Chinese mainland. The prevalence of mcr-1 in our ecosystem challenges the role of colistin as the last resort antibiotic to treat infections caused by carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae, say researchers.


What's that smell? The advantage of sniffing



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Breathe in through your nose, and chances are you will feel the air coming in and also smell something nearby. Researchers have discovered how these sensations are kept separate and why sniffing can help identify odors, two problems that have puzzled scientists for years. The study used a system in mice that systematically controls airflow and odor delivery.


Psychosis incidence highly variable internationally



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Rates of psychosis can be close to eight times higher in some regions compared to others, finds a new study.


Abnormal electrocardiogram findings are common in NBA players



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


About 1 in 5 professional basketball players had abnormalities on their electrocardiograms (ECGs), some but not all of which were explained by changes in the shape and size of their hearts as a result of athletic training.


Alzheimer's damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE gene



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. Now, researchers have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer's protein amyloid beta. The findings indicate that APOE could potentially be a real target for treatment or prevention.


New method helps identify causal mechanisms in depression



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


People with major depressive disorder have alterations in the activity and connectivity of brain systems underlying reward and memory, according to a new study. The findings provide clues as to which regions of the brain could be at the root of symptoms, such as reduced happiness and pleasure, in depression.


What makes a happy working mom?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother.


Humans at maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, study suggests



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Newly emerging trends in data suggests humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. These biological limitations may be affected by anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - which could have a deleterious effect on these limits. This review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while considering the effects of both genetic and environmental parameters.


Go with the flow (or against it)



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


Researchers are using magnetic fields to influence a specific type of bacteria to swim against strong currents, opening up the potential of using the microscopic organisms for drug delivery in environments with complex microflows- - like the human bloodstream.


Marshmallow-like silicone gels used as insulation in containers for cryopreserved embryos



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


As the genetic modification of mice is increasingly used in medical and biological research, so too is the need for an efficient way to transport cryopreserved embryos and sperm.


Dibenzoazepine defender: Drug found to be effective against resistant hepatitis C



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


Researchers have identified a class of chemicals that can combat resistant strains of the hepatitis C virus, as well as parasites that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis.


How ribosomes shape the proteome



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


Cells are crowded with macromolecules, which limits the diffusion of proteins, especially in prokaryotic cells without active transport in the cytoplasm. While investigating the relationship between crowding, ionic strength and protein diffusion, biochemists made a fascinating discovery: positively charged proteins stick to the surface of ribosome complexes. This explains why most water-soluble proteins carry an overall negative charge.


Exposure to wildfire smoke in utero lowers birthweight



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:22 AM PST


Economics researchers capitalize on the dynamics of wildfires to prove infants’ proximity to smoke pollution while in utero affects birthweight.


Youth who experience violent victimization seek intimate relationships at an earlier age



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:22 AM PST


Experiencing violence as an adolescent leads to early romantic relationships and cohabitating, research concludes. On average, they found that victimized youth entered romantic relationships nine months earlier than non-victimized youth.


City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:19 AM PST


Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in older adults, according to new research.


Is laughter the greatest medicine for cancer patients?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:18 AM PST


Spontaneous humor is used and appreciated by people with cancer and can be a helpful way of dealing with distressing, taboo or embarrassing circumstances, research shows.


New methods of tracking hospital nurses could help make workflow more efficient



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:07 AM PST


Previous studies about nurse workflow have used time-motion study methods, which involve manually observing nurses in person or on video and then clocking how much time they spend on each task. Now, an engineer has developed a method for better tracking how nurses in an intensive care unit (ICU) spend their workday. Findings could help improve the health care delivery process in the ICU and could also be applied to other health care procedures.


First DNA sequence from a single mitochondria



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:07 AM PST


DNA sequences between mitochondria within a single cell are vastly different, researchers found. This knowledge will help to better illuminate the underlying mechanisms of many disorders that start with accumulated mutations in individual mitochondria and provide clues about how patients might respond to specific therapies.


Research finds new ways to fight the opioid crisis



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


In the US alone, more than 2 million people struggle with opioid use disorders. Opioids, often prescribed as pain medications, have now become the country's leading cause of drug overdose. But scientists are identifying ways to help combat the epidemic, which include getting people treatment faster, developing safer opioids, and helping patients choose appropriate treatment.


Alarming amounts of noise demand ways to silence noisy hospital environments



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Spending a night in the hospital is not only stressful, but also loud. The constant beeps, whirrs and alarms ascend to a cacophony that produces anything but a relaxing, restful environment. Researchers summarize the limited number of studies available on hospital noise and discuss the different approaches health care facilities are taking to bring restful repose to patients across the country.


Disorders of the voice can affect a politician's success



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


The acoustics of political speech are known to be a powerful influencer of voter preferences, but vocal disorders can change the qualities of a person's speech, and voice scientists have found that this alters politicians' perceived charisma.


Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Chronic sleep deprivation -- which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school -- has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental health risks: new research finds that for teenagers, even a short period of sleep restriction could, over the long-term, raise their risk for depression and addiction.


New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors -- and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from an overdose.


US and Norwegian trials compare treatment options for opioid dependence



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


The current opioid epidemic is destroying lives, families, and communities. Medication is widely considered to be the most effective treatment, but far too few people who could benefit are actually treated.


Want to listen better? Lend a right ear



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


Listening requires sensitive hearing and the ability to process information into cohesive meaning. Add everyday background noise and constant interruptions, and the ability to comprehend what is heard becomes that much more difficult. Audiology researchers have found that in such demanding environments, both children and adults depend more on their right ear for processing and retaining what they hear.


'Green' cataract surgery model drastically reduces environmental footprint



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:06 AM PST


A healthcare center in India's model for cataract surgery emits 96 percent less carbon than in the United Kingdom -- and a likely even greater savings in the United States -- while yielding comparable or better health outcomes for one of the world's most common surgical procedures.


Brain activity and anxiety symptoms in youth with autism spectrum disorder



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:05 AM PST


The error-related negativity (ERN) is a brain signal response to errors that is thought to reflect threat sensitivity and has been implicated in anxiety disorders in individuals without autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


Hot flashes could be precursor to diabetes, study suggests



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:05 AM PST


Hot flashes, undoubtedly the most common symptom of menopause, are not just uncomfortable and inconvenient, but numerous studies demonstrate they may increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease. A new study suggests that hot flashes (especially when accompanied by night sweats) also may increase the risk of developing diabetes.


Is continuous electronic fetal monitoring useful for all women in labor?



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Electronic fetal monitoring is often used during labor to detect unborn babies at risk of brain damage (neonatal encephalopathy) from a lack of oxygen (hypoxia). In the UK, continuous monitoring is used only for women in high-risk labor, but should it be used for all women in labor?


Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands, study suggests



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research.


Traffic pollution putting unborn babies' health at risk, warn experts



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Air pollution from road traffic is having a detrimental impact upon babies' health in London, before they are born, finds a study.


Blood test could help predict skin cancer's return



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 05:30 PM PST


Testing skin cancer patients' blood for tumor DNA could help predict the chances of an aggressive cancer returning, scientists have discovered.


Sexual harassment on the job still carries large impact, study shows



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 02:02 PM PST


Researchers have revisited workplace sexual harassment issues after the initial study was done nearly 20 years ago.


Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 12:54 PM PST


Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study has shown.


In multiple myeloma, high levels of enzyme ADAR1 are associated with reduced survival



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 11:48 AM PST


Using a database of multiple myeloma patient samples and information, researchers found that high ADAR1 levels correlate with reduced survival rates. They also determined that blocking the enzyme reduces multiple myeloma regeneration in experimental models derived from patient cancer cells.


New weakness found in most common childhood malignant brain tumor



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 11:25 AM PST


A new weakness found in medulloblastoma, the most common form of childhood brain tumor, could lead to more personalized medicine and improved treatment for some patients, according to an early study.
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