ScienceDaily: Top Health News

Afgelopen vrijdag om 11:52


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Top Health News


Being treated unfairly at work increases risk of long-term sick leave
Many donor kidneys that are discarded may be suitable for transplantation
New mapping technique can help fight extreme poverty
Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth
Money-saving health plans do little to curb spending on unnecessary medical services
Recent research on causes of gun violence analyzed
Could death rates have swung the 2016 election?
Discrimination harms your health, and your partner's, study shows
Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go
Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool
Hope for autism: Optogenetics shines light on social interactions
Time matters: Does our biological clock keep cancer at bay?
'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease
Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movement
Why we can't always stop what we've started
Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damage
CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice
Physiochemical 'fingerprint' of parasitic 'American murderer' uncovered
New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks
Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age; may explain normal cognitive decline and neurodegeneration
Atlas of developing human brain launched by researchers
Electrical stimulation in brain bypasses senses, instructs movement
Canola oil linked to worsened memory and learning ability in Alzheimer's
Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancers
Psychologist examines methods of classifying mental disorders
A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cells
Scientist's accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detector
Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes
Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples
How malaria tricks the immune system
Genes behind higher education linked to lower risk of Alzheimer’s
Night owls have larger social networks than early birds
Recreational drug users not what we think
Is there a musical method for interpreting speech?
New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detection
First line combination therapy improves progression-free survival in advanced lung cancer
Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messages
Link found between morning sickness, smoking and healthy pregnancies
One-dose gene therapy produces clotting factor, safely stops bleeding in hemophilia B patients
Clot-busting drugs not recommended for most patients with blood clots
Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage, study shows
Finding long strands of RNA in skin development and disease
Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease
Can diet help reduce disability, symptoms of MS?
Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow
Probiotic gets a boost from breast milk


Being treated unfairly at work increases risk of long-term sick leave



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:42 PM PST


Staff who feel they are treated unfairly at work are at increased risk of being off sick more frequently and for longer, according to new research.


Many donor kidneys that are discarded may be suitable for transplantation



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 03:26 PM PST


In an analysis of pairs of kidneys from the same donor in which one kidney was used but the other was discarded, the kidneys that were used tended to perform well. The majority of discarded kidneys could have potentially been transplanted with good outcomes.


New mapping technique can help fight extreme poverty



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 03:25 PM PST


A new mapping technique shows how researchers are developing computational tools that combine cellphone records with data from satellites and geographic information systems to create timely and incredibly detailed poverty maps. Unlike surveys or censuses, which can take years and cost millions of dollars, these maps can be generated quickly and cost-efficiently.


Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 03:25 PM PST


Study shows a marked reduction in risky sex and substance abuse in troubled 18- to 24-year-olds after several months of participating in mindful yoga and positive coping strategies.


Money-saving health plans do little to curb spending on unnecessary medical services



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 01:07 PM PST


Claims for unnecessary medical services remain steady, despite changes in the insurance market designed to place more spending decisions in consumers' hands, report investigators. An increasingly common type of high-deductible insurance plan is touted for its money-saving potential, but a growing body of research indicates the plans don't motivate patients - or doctors - to curb spending on unnecessary medical services.


Recent research on causes of gun violence analyzed



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 01:07 PM PST


Consensus is growing in recent research evaluating the impact of right-to-carry concealed handgun laws, showing that they increase violent crime, despite what older research says.


Could death rates have swung the 2016 election?



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 12:45 PM PST


A new study shows that climbing mortality rates of middle-aged white people were associated with many counties voting Republican in the 2016 presidential election.


Discrimination harms your health, and your partner's, study shows



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 12:45 PM PST


Discrimination not only harms the health and well-being of the victim, but the victim's romantic partner as well, indicates new research.


Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 12:45 PM PST


Engineers have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they're at home or on the go.


Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:18 AM PST


Vast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests.


Hope for autism: Optogenetics shines light on social interactions



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


New research, using mice to identify a neural link between spatial learning and socialization, hints at new avenues to help people with autism and other social behavior disorders that affect their prefrontal cortex.


Time matters: Does our biological clock keep cancer at bay?



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Our body has an internal biological or 'circadian' clock, which cycles daily and is synchronized with solar time. New research done in mice suggests that it can help suppress cancer.


'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular disease. However, a new study finds that the 'obesity paradox' is not present among people with new cases of cardiovascular disease.


Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movement



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Finding ways to get around those broken networks in the brain is an important area of research for those seeking to develop treatment interventions. Now researchers are showing in monkeys that stimulation delivered directly to the premotor cortex can elicit a feeling or experience that can instruct different movements, even when the stimulus is too small to induce any response directly.


Why we can't always stop what we've started



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


When we try to stop a body movement at the last second, perhaps to keep ourselves from stepping on what we just realized was ice, we can't always do it -- and neuroscientists have figured out why.


Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damage



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers are using adaptive optics (AO) to analyze retinal eye damage from the August solar eclipse on a cellular level. The research could help doctors develop a deeper understanding of this rare condition, called solar retinopathy, which has no currently accepted treatment.


CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Scientists report a modified CRISPR-Cas9 technique that alters the activity, rather than the underlying sequence, of disease-associated genes. The researchers demonstrate that this technique can be used in mice to treat several different diseases.


Physiochemical 'fingerprint' of parasitic 'American murderer' uncovered



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


The physical and chemical 'fingerprint' profile of a parasitic worm, which infects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, has been uncovered by researchers -- a discovery that could allow for more effective and earlier treatment. They have captured detailed movies reproducing the process the worm goes through as it enters the body and sheds its skin allowing them to interrogate the worm surface and its sheath in unprecedented detail.


New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Researchers describe a new approach to prevent death in essential kidney cells during kidney disease. Studying multiple animal models of kidney disease, the team discovered a compound that can impede loss of the filtration cells and restore kidney function. The work, inspired by an investigation into a genetic form of the condition, has the potential to affect therapeutic research for millions of people suffering from progressive kidney diseases.


Mutations in neurons accumulate as we age; may explain normal cognitive decline and neurodegeneration



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Researchers used whole-genome sequencing of individual neurons and found strong evidence that brain mutations accumulate as we age. They also found that mutations accumulate at a higher rate in people with genetic premature aging disorders causing early brain degeneration.


Atlas of developing human brain launched by researchers



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Scientists have taken the first step towards a comprehensive atlas of gene expression in cells across the developing human brain, making available new insights into how specific cells and gene networks contribute to building this most complex of organs, and serving as a resource for researchers around the world to study the interplay between these genetic programs and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, and schizophrenia.


Electrical stimulation in brain bypasses senses, instructs movement



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


The brain's complex network of neurons enables us to interpret and effortlessly navigate and interact with the world around us. But when these links are damaged due to injury or stroke, critical tasks like perception and movement can be disrupted. New research is helping scientists figure out how to harness the brain's plasticity to rewire these lost connections, an advance that could accelerate the development of neuro-prosthetics.


Canola oil linked to worsened memory and learning ability in Alzheimer's



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Canola oil is one of the most widely consumed vegetable oils, yet little is known about its health effects. Now, a study links canola oil consumption in the diet with worsened memory, worsened learning ability and weight gain in mice which model Alzheimer's disease. It's the first study to suggest that canola oil is more harmful than healthful for the brain.


Mechanism identified behind enzyme involved in liver and other human cancers



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:09 AM PST


To understand what has gone wrong when cancer occurs and to create new possibilities for treatment, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms behind what is happening at the cellular level. New research explains how the motor of an enzyme in DNA damage repair is switched on and off and how these processes might go awry in cancer.


Psychologist examines methods of classifying mental disorders



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


A new article presents the challenges in using three major diagnostic manuals from a scientific perspective and offer some recommendations for re-conceptualizing the mental disorders they describe.


A spring-loaded sensor for cholesterol in cells



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


New research explains how an enzyme acts as a kind of thermostat that responds to and adjusts levels of cholesterol in the cell. This insight could lead to new strategies for combating high cholesterol.


Scientist's accidental exhale leads to improved DNA detector



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 09:59 AM PST


A novel nanoscale device has been developed for detecting DNA biomarkers. The device preconfines translocating molecules using an ultrathin nanoporous silicon nitride membrane separated from a single sensing nanopore by a nanoscale cavity. The membrane serves as a pre-filter and improves the DNA sensing capabilities of the nanopore in multiple ways.


Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 08:49 AM PST


A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study.


Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 08:48 AM PST


Researchers have studied 389,166 volunteers who gave DNA samples to the UK Biobank, US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In addition to confirming the eight genetic variants that had already been linked to longevity, this study found 17 more to expand the list of known variants affecting lifespan to 25 genes, with some sex-specific.


How malaria tricks the immune system



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 07:24 AM PST


A possible defense in the battle against malaria has now been presented by a team of researchers.


Genes behind higher education linked to lower risk of Alzheimer’s



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:54 AM PST


Using genetic information, researchers provide new evidence that higher educational attainment is strongly associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease.


Night owls have larger social networks than early birds



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:53 AM PST


Using anonymous mobile phone data, researchers have tapped into patterns in people’s behavior. They have found out that our ‘chronotypes’ – our inherent periods of sleep during a 24-hour-period – correlate with the size of our social networks and how much we are in contact with others and also the kind of chronotypes with whom we interact.


Recreational drug users not what we think



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:50 AM PST


A researcher has been investigating why Australians are among the top users of illegal drugs in the world -- and has uncovered some revealing new facts about the motivations of recreational drug users.


Is there a musical method for interpreting speech?



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:50 AM PST


Vocoded speech, or distorted speech that imitates voice transduction by a cochlear implant, is used throughout acoustic and auditory research to explore speech comprehension under various conditions. Researchers evaluated whether musicians had an advantage in understanding and reciting degraded speech as compared to nonmusicians.


New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detection



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:50 AM PST


New diagnostic methods offer a better chance for more accurate detection of the infection from the Lyme bacteria, the most common tick-borne infection in North America and Europe.


First line combination therapy improves progression-free survival in advanced lung cancer



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:49 AM PST


A new combination therapy for the first line treatment of advanced non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improves progression-free survival (PFS), according to results of a phase III IMpower150 trial.


Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messages



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 06:49 AM PST


What if you could look into the brains of potential drug abusers and see what messages would be most likely to persuade them to 'just say no?' That's the ultimate goal of researchers whose new study scanned the brains of people while they watched anti-drug public service announcements.


Link found between morning sickness, smoking and healthy pregnancies



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 04:37 PM PST


A link between the 'old wives' tale that morning sickness may indicate a healthy pregnancy, and the reason smoking is so detrimental has been found, according to a new review. The article discusses the importance of the hormone endokinin for healthy pregnancies, its role in causing morning sickness, and how its normal function may be adversely affected by smoking, leading to poor outcomes in pregnancy.


One-dose gene therapy produces clotting factor, safely stops bleeding in hemophilia B patients



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 02:42 PM PST


A team of gene therapy researchers has reported positive results in a phase 1/2 clinical trial for the inherited bleeding disorder hemophilia B. A single intravenous infusion of a novel bioengineered gene therapy enabled adult participants to safely produce sustained levels of clotting factor that prevented debilitating bleeding episodes. Patients were able to terminate prophylactic treatments; the gene therapy nearly universally eliminated their need for intravenous infusions of manufactured clotting factor.


Clot-busting drugs not recommended for most patients with blood clots



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 02:42 PM PST


About half of people with blood clots in the deep veins of their legs develop a complication that involves chronic limb pain and swelling, making it difficult to walk and perform daily activities. A large-scale clinical trial has shown that a risky, costly procedure to remove such clot fails to reduce the likelihood that patients will develop the debilitating complication.


Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage, study shows



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 02:42 PM PST


A two-way link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes has been uncovered by research. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage.


Finding long strands of RNA in skin development and disease



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Researchers have discovered how unusually long pieces of RNA work in skin cells. The RNA pieces, called 'long non-coding RNAs' or 'lncRNAs,' help skin cells modulate connective tissue proteins, like collagen, and could represent novel therapeutic targets to promote skin repair.


Existing cancer medication offers potential to treat Huntington's disease



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


A drug already used to treat certain forms of cancer appears to be an effective therapy for Huntington's disease, and offers a potential pathway to treat other neurodegenerative diseases.


Can diet help reduce disability, symptoms of MS?



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables and whole grains may be linked to having less disability and fewer symptoms than people whose diet is less healthy, according to a study.


Cryo-EM reveals 'crown-like' structure of protein responsible for regulating blood flow



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Scientists have revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of a promising drug target for conditions such as stroke and traumatic brain injury.


Probiotic gets a boost from breast milk



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:21 AM PST


Supplementation with probiotics can improve a person's gut health, but the benefits are often fleeting, and colonization by the probiotic's good microbes usually doesn't last. Breast milk may help sustain those colonies in the long run, say researchers.
You are subscribed to email updates from Top Health News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categorieën: Wetenschap
Leeftijd: 14 t/m 18 jaar 19 t/m 30 jaar 31 t/m 64 jaar 65 jaar en ouder

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2017