ScienceDaily: Top Health News

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ScienceDaily: Top Health News


Scientists uncover a new face of a famous protein, SWI2/SNF2 ATPase
'Undermatched' students less likely to graduate on time compared to peers
More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response
Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells
Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brains
Emergency contact info helps researchers branch out family tree
What we've learned about the nucleolus since you left school
How social isolation transforms the brain
Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemia
Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect clues
Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver disease
Shedding light on brain's ability to orchestrate movement
Above us only sky: The open air as an underappreciated habitat
Brain abnormality indicates general risk for mental illness
Faster test for cannabis quality
La Trobe's infection-busting discovery
Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neurons
Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart health
Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couples
Most deprived are nearly twice as likely to develop dementia
Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target joints
Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia
Cellular valve structure opens up potential novel therapies


Scientists uncover a new face of a famous protein, SWI2/SNF2 ATPase



Posted: 17 May 2018 01:33 PM PDT


A team of scientists now have a deeper understanding of a large switch/sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF) protein complex that plays a pivotal role in plant and human gene expression that causes life-threatening diseases such as cancer.


'Undermatched' students less likely to graduate on time compared to peers



Posted: 17 May 2018 01:33 PM PDT


A new study finds that undermatching -- when high-performing students, often from economically-disadvantaged households, attend less competitive colleges than their qualifications permit -- correlates to another higher education dilemma: delayed graduation. The study shows that students who undermatch are less likely to graduate college within four or six years compared to peers who do not undermatch.


More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


Mosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system.


Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells



Posted: 17 May 2018 09:33 AM PDT


A robotic system has been developed to automate the production of human mini-organs derived from stem cells. The ability to rapidly, mass produce organoids promises to expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery. The system was tested in producing kidney organoids, including models of polycystic kidney disease. The robots were also programmed to analyze the organoids they produced.


Learning music or speaking another language leads to more efficient brains



Posted: 17 May 2018 09:32 AM PDT


Whether you learn to play a musical instrument or speak another language, you're training your brain to be more efficient, suggests a new study. Researchers found that musicians and people who are bilingual utilized fewer brain resources when completing a working memory task, according to recently published findings.


Emergency contact info helps researchers branch out family tree



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:39 AM PDT


A collaborative team of researchers from three major academic medical centers in New York City is showing that emergency contact information, which is included in individuals' electronic health records (EHRs), can be used to generate family trees. Those family trees in turn can be used to study heritability in hundreds of medical conditions.


What we've learned about the nucleolus since you left school



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:39 AM PDT


The size of a cell's nucleolus may reveal how long that cell, or even the organism it belongs to, will live. Over the past few years, researchers have been piecing together an unexpected link between aging and an organelle often called the cell's ribosome factory (or just a blob in the middle of the nucleus). A new report outlines the connections between the nucleolus and age-related pathways.


How social isolation transforms the brain



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Researchers gain new insights into the brain mechanisms underlying the negative effects caused by long-term social isolation.


Single surface protein boosts multiple oncogenic pathways in acute myeloid leukemia



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Researchers have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers.


Surprise cell death discovery provides birth defect clues



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Researchers have made a surprise discovery that could rewrite our understanding of the role programmed cell death plays in embryonic development and congenital birth defects. The team showed that, while programmed cell death -- or apoptosis -- is essential for healthy development overall, many organs and tissues do not require apoptosis to develop normally. The study also suggested that abnormalities in cell death processes are likely to contribute to some common birth defects in humans, such as spina bifida, heart vessel defects and cleft palate.


Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver disease



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Researchers have identified a key fork in the road for the way the liver deals with carbohydrates, fats and protein. They say it could be a promising new target for combating the pandemics of fatty liver disease and prediabetes.


Shedding light on brain's ability to orchestrate movement



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:38 AM PDT


New research in mice reveals how specialized neurons allow the brain to construct sequences of movements. Damage to these neurons disrupts the ability to correctly string together movements into desired actions. The findings may inform the study and eventual treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's.


Above us only sky: The open air as an underappreciated habitat



Posted: 17 May 2018 08:37 AM PDT


Scientists have collated the current scientific knowledge on potential hazards to one group of animals flying at high altitudes, bats. Researchers synthesize threats facing bats in troposphere and provide recommendations for potential protective measures to ensure persistence of bats and other high-flying animals.


Brain abnormality indicates general risk for mental illness



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:24 AM PDT


A new study reports an abnormality in visual regions of the brain that is associated with a person's general risk for mental illness. The findings indicate a signature abnormality shared between common forms of mental illness, which could help clinicians assess a patient's general risk for developing a mental illness.


Faster test for cannabis quality



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


Researchers have developed a new method of measuring phytocannabinoids -- the primary bioactive molecules in cannabis -- that will lead to faster, safer and more accurate information for producers, regulators and consumers alike.


La Trobe's infection-busting discovery



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


Scientists have shown a protein found in a tobacco plant has the potential to fight life-threatening infectious diseases.


Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neurons



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


The more intelligent a person, the fewer connections there are between the neurons in his cerebral cortex. This is the result of a study conducted by neuroscientists; the study was performed using a specific neuroimaging technique that provides insights into the wiring of the brain on a microstructural level.


Keep saying yes to fish twice a week for heart health



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


A new scientific advisory reaffirms the recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week.


Male depression may lower pregnancy chances among infertile couples



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


Among couples being treated for infertility, depression in the male partner was linked to lower pregnancy chances, while depression in the female partner was not found to influence the rate of live birth, according to a new study. The study also linked a class of antidepressants known as non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (non-SSRIs) to a higher risk of early pregnancy loss among females being treated for infertility.


Most deprived are nearly twice as likely to develop dementia



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Older adults in England with fewer financial resources are more likely to develop dementia, according to new research.


Why chikungunya, other arthritis-causing viruses target joints



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Scientists have understood little about how chikungunya and related viruses cause arthritis. Now, researchers at have identified the molecular handle that chikungunya grabs to get inside cells. The findings could lead to ways to prevent or treat disease caused by chikungunya and related viruses.


Under certain conditions, bacterial signals set the stage for leukemia



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


A new study shows that bacterial signals are crucial to the development of a precursor condition to leukemia, which can be induced by disrupting the intestinal barrier or by introducing a bacterial infection.


Cellular valve structure opens up potential novel therapies



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Biochemists have determined the detailed structure of a volume-regulated chloride channel. This cellular valve is activated in response to swelling to prevent the cell from bursting. The protein also plays an important role in the uptake of chemotherapeutics and the release of neurotransmitters after a stroke. The controlled regulation of its activity thus opens up a promising strategy for novel therapies.
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