ScienceDaily: Top News

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ScienceDaily: Top News


Fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliation
Short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergers
Bone mass may suffer when teenage girls binge drink
US painkiller restriction linked to 'significant' increase in illicit online drug trading
No clear evidence that nicotine 'preloading' helps smokers to quit
Scientists discover biomarker for flu susceptibility
Decades of satellite monitoring reveal Antarctic ice loss
Antarctica ramps up sea level rise
Climate change accelerating rise in sea levels
Ancient agricultural activity caused lasting environmental changes
One thing you'll find in the obits of many long-living people
Magnetic 3D-printed structures crawl, roll, and jump
Narwhals' acoustic behavior described using audio tagging
Ammonia distribution in Earth's upper atmosphere
For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of tick's worst day ever
Eczema: Flipping the switch on itch
Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levels
Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patients
Stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidification
Organics on Ceres may be more abundant than originally thought
People recall information better through virtual reality
Carrying standby antibiotics encourages travelers to careless antibiotic use
Platform uses artificial intelligence to diagnose Zika and other pathogens
Content of service members' art linked to their trauma levels
Needle release optimal treatment for Viking disease
New mechanism by which Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain discovered
Neuronal activity sheds light on the origin of consciousness
Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces
Large-scale whaling in north Scandinavia may date back to 6th century
Mediterranean-style eating with lean, unprocessed red meat improves heart disease risk
E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger
Adolescents who consume diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress skills
Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian species
Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressure
Old Man River's unique chemical signature
Automated robotic device for faster blood testing
High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weed
Floridians took Zika threat more seriously than rest of US -- but still most did nothing
'Gut instinct' may have been the GPS of human ancestors
Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assembly
Digital devices during family time could exacerbate bad behavior
Tracking energy flow in large molecules
Computer program looks five minutes into the future
Scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctions
No link found between oral antifungal drug and stillbirth
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland
Painted lady's roundtrip migratory flight is the longest recorded in butterflies
British mammals' fight for survival
Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
Original habitat is best, but restoration still makes a big difference
Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from wines
To forecast winter rainfall in the Southwest, look to New Zealand in the summer
Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana
Trio of infant planets discovered around newborn star
Dementia can be caused by hypertension
How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass through
Conformity trumps riskiness in social fish


Fair classroom practices disarm threat of evaluation retaliation



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 10:51 PM PDT


While tuition inflation presents a challenge for many college-bound students, an area of growing concern for many universities is 'grade inflation' -- in part caused when instructors grade more leniently to discourage students from retaliating by giving low teaching evaluations. Researchers say instructors can stop worrying about evaluation revenge as long as they use practices in the classroom that students perceive as fair.


Short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergers



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 10:51 PM PDT


Researchers have confirmed that last fall's union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst.


Bone mass may suffer when teenage girls binge drink



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 10:50 PM PDT


Teenage girls who regularly binge drink may fail to reach their peak bone mass, according to a new study.


US painkiller restriction linked to 'significant' increase in illicit online drug trading



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 05:53 PM PDT


The US Drug Enforcement Administration's decision to restrict prescription drugs containing hydrocodone (a popular opioid painkiller) was associated with a 'significant' increase in illicit trading of opioids through online markets, finds a study published by The BMJ today.


No clear evidence that nicotine 'preloading' helps smokers to quit



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 05:52 PM PDT


There is insufficient evidence to show that using nicotine patches for four weeks before a quit attempt (known as 'preloading') improves long-term smoking abstinence, finds a new trial.


Scientists discover biomarker for flu susceptibility



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 05:52 PM PDT


Researchers have found a way to predict whether someone exposed to the flu virus is likely to become ill. They used a computational approach to pinpoint a blood-based genetic biomarker to determine an individual's susceptibility to the disease.


Decades of satellite monitoring reveal Antarctic ice loss



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


Scientists have reviewed decades of satellite measurements to reveal how and why Antarctica's glaciers, ice shelves and sea ice are changing. Their report explains how ice shelf thinning and collapse have triggered an increase in the continent's contribution to sea level rise.


Antarctica ramps up sea level rise



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


Ice losses from Antarctica have increased global sea levels by 7.6 mm since 1992, with two fifths of this rise (3.0 mm) coming in the last five years alone. The findings are from a major climate assessment known as the Ice Sheet Mass Balance Inter-comparison Exercise (IMBIE). It is the most complete picture of Antarctic ice sheet change to date -- 84 scientists from 44 international organizations combined 24 satellite surveys to produce the assessment.


Climate change accelerating rise in sea levels



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


A new study has discovered that rising sea levels could be accelerated by vulnerable ice shelves in the Antarctic.


Ancient agricultural activity caused lasting environmental changes



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


Agricultural activity by humans more than 2,000 years ago had a more significant and lasting impact on the environment than previously thought.


One thing you'll find in the obits of many long-living people



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


A new nationwide study of obituaries has found that people with religious affiliations lived nearly four years longer than those with no ties to religion.


Magnetic 3D-printed structures crawl, roll, and jump



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


Engineers have created soft, 3D-printed structures whose movements can be controlled with a wave of a magnet, much like marionettes without the strings. The menagerie of structures that can be magnetically manipulated includes a smooth ring that wrinkles up, a long tube that squeezes shut, a sheet that folds itself, and a spider-like 'grabber' that can crawl, roll, jump, and snap together fast enough to catch a passing ball.


Narwhals' acoustic behavior described using audio tagging



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:30 PM PDT


The clicking, buzzing and calling behavioral patterns of elusive East Greenland narwhals have been described thanks to in-depth recordings.


Ammonia distribution in Earth's upper atmosphere



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:28 PM PDT


A new study helps clarify how ammonia is present in Earth's upper atmosphere. Using computer modeling, the researchers found ammonia molecules trapped in liquid cloud droplets are released during convection where these particles freeze and subsequently collide in the upper atmosphere.


For 100 million years, amber freezes a tableau of tick's worst day ever



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:27 PM PDT


This is the first time this kind of interaction between ticks and spiders has been documented in the fossil record. Even though ticks aren't a typical staple of spider diets, spiders can occasionally prey on ticks in modern ecosystems.


Eczema: Flipping the switch on itch



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:27 PM PDT


Researchers have pinpointed a particular neuropeptide associated with transmitting itch signals in mice with atopic dermatitis. The work sheds further light on the pathways involved in transmitting itch sensations from the peripheral (skin) to the central (spinal cord) nervous system.


Lentils significantly reduce blood glucose levels



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:27 PM PDT


Replacing potatoes or rice with pulses can lower your blood glucose levels by more than 20 per cent, according to a new study. Researchers found that swapping out half of a portion of these starchy side dishes for lentils can significantly improve your body's response to the carbohydrates. Replacing half a serving of rice with lentils caused blood glucose to drop by up to 20 per cent. Replacing potatoes with lentils led to a 35-per-cent drop.


Cannabis does not increase suicidal behavior in psychiatric patients



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:26 PM PDT


Researchers have found there is no significant association between cannabis use and suicidal behavior in people with psychiatric disorders. The study findings contrast with pre-existing data that shows the drug is linked to an increased chance of suicidal behavior in the general population.


Stress test to predict how diatoms will react to ocean acidification



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:26 PM PDT


Researchers have shown that diatoms can withstand population collapse in an acidified environment by conserving valuable energy normally used for carbon dioxide consumption.


Organics on Ceres may be more abundant than originally thought



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:26 PM PDT


A new analysis of data from NASA's Dawn mission suggests that organic matter may exist in surprisingly high concentrations on the dwarf planet's surface.


People recall information better through virtual reality



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 01:26 PM PDT


Researchers conducted one of the first in-depth analyses on whether people learn better through virtual, immersive environments, as opposed to more traditional platforms like a two-dimensional desktop computer or hand-held tablet. The researchers found that people remember information better if it is presented to them in a virtual environment.


Carrying standby antibiotics encourages travelers to careless antibiotic use



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Travelers carrying standby antibiotics take them more often than those traveling without such drugs, shows a recent study. Having antibiotics packed in the bags allows their use -- against recommendations -- also for mild and moderate diarrhea.


Platform uses artificial intelligence to diagnose Zika and other pathogens



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:38 AM PDT


Method created in Brazil combines mass spectrometry analysis of blood serum with an algorithm that recognizes patterns associated with diseases from various origins. Adoption of machine learning technique allows the program to adapt itself to possible viral mutations.


Content of service members' art linked to their trauma levels



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


A new study found that military service members recovering from PTSD who still identified as a member of a unit have lower levels of psychological injuries.


Needle release optimal treatment for Viking disease



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


The various treatments for 'Viking disease' are coming under closer scrutiny. Research shows that crooked fingers can be straightened just as well with needle release as with the substantially more expensive commonly used drug.


New mechanism by which Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain discovered



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


The waste-disposal system in a cell can spread harmful protein aggregates between neurons in the brain in Alzheimer's disease. The spread can be reduced in experiments in cultivated cells. The discovery may help the development of new diagnostic methods, and may eventually lead to new drugs that can stop or reduce the progression of disease.


Neuronal activity sheds light on the origin of consciousness



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


A new study identifies and measures the neural activity associated with a new conscious experience. It takes researchers a step closer to solving the mystery of consciousness.


Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


Sharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them. Researchers have designed a coating that is infused with antimicrobial agents and has the patterned diamond-like texture of shark skin.


Large-scale whaling in north Scandinavia may date back to 6th century



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


The intensive whaling that has pushed many species to the brink of extinction today may be several centuries older than previously assumed.


Mediterranean-style eating with lean, unprocessed red meat improves heart disease risk



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


Adopting a Mediterranean-style eating pattern improves heart health, with or without reducing red meat intake, if the red meat consumed is lean and unprocessed, according to a new nutrition study.


E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


Electronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing -- something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable. A video of an e-wristband in action is available.


Adolescents who consume diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress skills



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


Adolescents who consume a diet high in saturated fats may develop poor stress coping skills, signs of post-traumatic stress disorder as adults.


Deadly fungus found for first time in critically endangered amphibian species



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:37 AM PDT


A fungal pathogen which has led to the extinction of entire species in South America has been recorded for the first time in critically endangered amphibians in India.


Environmental threats put bumblebee queens under pressure



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:36 AM PDT


Researchers found that environmental threats are piling onto the stress faced by nest-building bumblebee queens.


Old Man River's unique chemical signature



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 08:36 AM PDT


Human activity greatly impacts the natural chemistry of the largest river in North America -- the Mississippi River. In a new, large-scale study, geologists have identified a unique chemical signature in the river.


Automated robotic device for faster blood testing



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Researchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results, potentially improving the workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients.


High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weed



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


In sub-Saharan Africa, 20 to 80% of corn yields may be lost because of a semi-parasitic plant, Striga. In areas infested with Striga, farmers may even lose their entire crops. In a new study, researchers from southern Africa identified several varieties of corn resistant or tolerant to Striga. Importantly, these varieties also have improved nutritional content, particularly protein.


Floridians took Zika threat more seriously than rest of US -- but still most did nothing



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Threatened by the mosquito-borne Zika virus in 2016, Florida residents felt more susceptible than others in the United States to getting the virus, were more knowledgeable about it, and were more likely to support taking community action against it. Floridians were nearly twice as likely as non-Floridians to say they took steps to protect themselves from Zika. Even so, fewer than half of Floridians said they actually did take preventive measures.


'Gut instinct' may have been the GPS of human ancestors



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


A new study reveals that the nerve connecting the gut to the brain is key for remembering where food is.


Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assembly



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Researchers have produced snapshots of the 'protein factories' of the cell. Their findings could set us on the path towards a new class of antibiotics.


Digital devices during family time could exacerbate bad behavior



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Parents who spend a lot of time on their phones or watching television during family activities such as meals, playtime, and bedtime could influence their long-term relationships with their children. This is according to researchers who say so called 'technoference' can lead children to show more frustration, hyperactivity, whining, sulking or tantrums.


Tracking energy flow in large molecules



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Scientists have developed a novel and unambiguous way to track energy flow in polyatomic molecules at ultrashort timescales.


Computer program looks five minutes into the future



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Scientists have developed software that can look minutes into the future: The program learns the typical sequence of actions, such as cooking, from video sequences. Then it can predict in new situations what the chef will do at which point in time.


Scientists discover a new way to find mass extinctions



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


During the history of the Earth, there were many mass extinctions, when huge numbers of species died out. They are usually easy to identify because of the sudden extinctions, followed by a gap, and then the recovery of life.


No link found between oral antifungal drug and stillbirth



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


New research does not support a suggested link between treatment with the oral antifungal drug fluconazole during pregnancy and an increased risk of stillbirth.


Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Research indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.


Painted lady's roundtrip migratory flight is the longest recorded in butterflies



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Researchers found that painted lady butterflies return from the Afrotropical region to recolonize the Mediterranean in early spring, traveling an annual distance of 12,000 km across the Sahara Desert.


British mammals' fight for survival



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:20 AM PDT


Almost one in five of British mammal species face a high risk of extinction, according to a recent comprehensive review of their populations.


Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting.


Original habitat is best, but restoration still makes a big difference



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


A new study presents some of the best evidence to date that restoration efforts in Missouri's Ozark Highlands make a difference for nesting songbirds that breed there. Recent studies support that these efforts are making a positive impact on the ecosystem and increasing the survival of bird species that breed there.


Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from wines



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


From vine to wine, grapes undergo a remarkable transformation. But sometimes this makeover results in vino that doesn't taste quite right. Scientists now report that they have found a way to use tiny magnetic particles to remove off-tasting substances in cabernet sauvignon without altering its desired bouquet. Eventually, they say this technique could help remove unwanted flavors from other wines.


To forecast winter rainfall in the Southwest, look to New Zealand in the summer



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


Scientists have discovered an atmospheric teleconnection that allows them to accurately predict winter precipitation in the southwestern United States by measuring summer sea surface temperatures near New Zealand.


Network biology reveals pathogen targets in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


Using systems biology, researchers successfully identified previously unknown protein targets of plant pathogens in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana, employing some of the same methods used to analyze social networks or biological networks. Their theoretical framework, they say, could help analyze other interactions between species to reveal pathogen contact points.


Trio of infant planets discovered around newborn star



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


Two independent teams of astronomers have uncovered convincing evidence that three young planets are in orbit around an infant star known as HD 163296. Using a new planet-finding strategy, the astronomers identified three discrete disturbances in a young star's gas-filled disk: the strongest evidence yet that newly formed planets are in orbit there.


Dementia can be caused by hypertension



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


A new study indicates that patients with high blood pressure are at a higher risk of developing dementia. This research also shows (for the first time) that an MRI can be used to detect very early signatures of neurological damage in people with high blood pressure, before any symptoms of dementia occur.


How 'gatekeepers' to a cell's nucleus let genetic instructions pass through



Posted: 13 Jun 2018 07:19 AM PDT


Researchers have revealed how the human nuclear pore complex is involved in the flow of genetic information.


Conformity trumps riskiness in social fish



Posted: 12 Jun 2018 05:18 PM PDT


Researchers have discovered that more sociable fish suppress their own personality when they are with a partner.
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