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ScienceDaily: Top Science News


3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function
Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model
Unique field survey yields first big-picture view of deep-sea food webs
Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's
More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate
Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaur
Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath
Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solved
ALMA finds massive primordial galaxies swimming in vast ocean of dark matter
The world's smallest Mona Lisa
Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universe
Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models
Humans at maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, study suggests
How the oldest compound eyes were constructed
Litte Foot takes a bow
City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's
Discovery about rare nitrogen molecules offers clues to makeup of life-supporting planets
Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea
Weight management program can put type 2 diabetes into remission


3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Hospitals are making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly.


Birth of a storm in the Arabian Sea validates climate model



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Extreme cyclones that formed in the Arabian Sea for the first time in 2014 are the result of global warming and will likely increase in frequency, warn scientists. Their model showed that the burning of fossil fuels since 1860 would lead to an increase in the destructive storms in the Arabian Sea by 2015, marking one of the first times that modeled projections have synchronized with real observations of storm activity.


Unique field survey yields first big-picture view of deep-sea food webs



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


A new article documents the first comprehensive study of deep-sea food webs, using hundreds of video observations of animals caught in the act of feeding off the Central California coast. The study shows that deep-sea jellies are key predators, and provides new information on how deep-sea animals interact with life near the ocean surface.


Healthy mitochondria could stop Alzheimer's



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:25 AM PST


Using a bioinformatics and experimental approach, scientists have found that rendering mitochondria resistant to damage can halt diseases caused by amyloid toxicity, such as Alzheimer's disease.


More-severe climate model predictions could be the most accurate



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


The climate models that project greater amounts of warming this century are the ones that best align with observations of the current climate, according to a article. Their findings suggest that the models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, on average, may be underestimating future warming.


Synchrotron sheds light on the amphibious lifestyle of a new raptorial dinosaur



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


A well-preserved dinosaur skeleton from Mongolia unites an unexpected combination of features that defines a new group of semi-aquatic predators related to Velociraptor. Detailed 3-D synchrotron analysis allowed an international team of researchers to present the bizarre 75-million-year-old predator, named Halszkaraptor escuilliei. The study not only describes a new genus and species of bird-like dinosaur that lived in Mongolia but also sheds light on an unexpected amphibious lifestyle for raptorial dinosaurs.


Clay minerals on Mars may have formed in primordial steam bath



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


New research suggests that the bulk of clay minerals on Mars could have been formed as the planet's crust cooled and solidified, not by later interactions with water on the surface as has long been assumed.


Living on thin air -- microbe mystery solved



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:22 AM PST


Scientists have discovered that microbes in Antarctica have a previously unknown ability to scavenge hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from the air to stay alive in the extreme conditions. The find has implications for the search for life on other planets, suggesting extraterrestrial microbes could also rely on trace atmospheric gases for survival.


ALMA finds massive primordial galaxies swimming in vast ocean of dark matter



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:20 AM PST


New observations push back the epoch of massive-galaxy formation even further by identifying two giant galaxies seen when the universe was only 780 million years old, or about 5 percent its current age.


The world's smallest Mona Lisa



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:20 AM PST


New techniques in DNA self-assembly allow researchers to create the largest to-date customizable patterns with nanometer precision on a budget.


Scientists observe supermassive black hole in infant universe



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 10:19 AM PST


A team of astronomers has detected the most distant supermassive black hole ever observed. The black hole sits in the center of an ultrabright quasar and presents a puzzle as to how such a huge object could have grown so quickly.


Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:26 AM PST


A team of researchers has 3-D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.


Humans at maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance, study suggests



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Newly emerging trends in data suggests humans may have reached their maximum limits for height, lifespan and physical performance. These biological limitations may be affected by anthropogenic impacts on the environment - including climate change - which could have a deleterious effect on these limits. This review is the first of its kind spanning 120 years worth of historical information, while considering the effects of both genetic and environmental parameters.


How the oldest compound eyes were constructed



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


Researchers have discovered that the compound eyes of today's insects and crustaceans are still constructed in much the same way as they were in their extinct ancestors 500 million years ago. The research team looked at fossil trilobites. However, these arthropods lacked the lenses of contemporary compound eyes.


Litte Foot takes a bow



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 07:01 AM PST


Little Foot is the only known virtually complete Australopithecus fossil discovered to date. It is by far the most complete skeleton of a human ancestor older than 1.5 million years ever found. It is also the oldest fossil hominid in southern Africa, dating back 3.67 million years. For the first time ever, the completely cleaned and reconstructed skeleton was viewed by the national and international media.


City air pollution cancels positive health effects of exercise in over 60's



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:19 AM PST


Exposure to air pollution on city streets is enough to counter the beneficial health effects of exercise in older adults, according to new research.


Discovery about rare nitrogen molecules offers clues to makeup of life-supporting planets



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:07 AM PST


A new study on atmospheric nitrogen provides a clue about what geochemical signatures of other planets might look like, especially if they are capable of supporting life as we know it.


Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:07 AM PST


Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water.


Weight management program can put type 2 diabetes into remission



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 06:16 AM PST


Type 2 diabetes can be reversed following an intensive weight management program, according a randomized trial in adults who have had the condition for up to 6 years. Almost half of participants achieved and maintained diabetes remission at one year without antidiabetic medications.
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