ScienceDaily: Top Science News

Afgelopen vrijdag om 11:53


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Life of an albatross: Tackling individuality in studies of populations
'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease
Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movement
CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice
Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress
Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia
Crafty crows know what it takes to make a good tool
Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy
Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methane
It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals
Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric
Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples
More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered
New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia
Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage, study shows
Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes
Viruses share genes with organisms across the tree of life, study finds
New approach measures early human butchering practices
Lemurs maintain gut health through 'huddling' together


Life of an albatross: Tackling individuality in studies of populations



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 03:25 PM PST


Ecologists commonly round off the individuality of individuals, treating animals of the same species, sex, and age like identical units. But individual differences can have demographic effects on interpretation of data at the scale of whole populations, if due to an underlying variability in individual quality, not chance. Researchers examined in the peculiarities that make some wandering albatrosses more successful than others.


'Obesity paradox' not found when measuring new cases of cardiovascular disease



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for getting cardiovascular disease, a controversial body of research suggests that obesity may actually be associated with improved survival among people who have cardiovascular disease. However, a new study finds that the 'obesity paradox' is not present among people with new cases of cardiovascular disease.


Monkey feel, monkey do: Microstimulation in premotor cortex can instruct movement



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Finding ways to get around those broken networks in the brain is an important area of research for those seeking to develop treatment interventions. Now researchers are showing in monkeys that stimulation delivered directly to the premotor cortex can elicit a feeling or experience that can instruct different movements, even when the stimulus is too small to induce any response directly.


CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Scientists report a modified CRISPR-Cas9 technique that alters the activity, rather than the underlying sequence, of disease-associated genes. The researchers demonstrate that this technique can be used in mice to treat several different diseases.


Heart monitors on wild narwhals reveal alarming responses to stress



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Stress from human disturbances could cause behavioral responses in narwhals that are inconsistent with their physiological capacities, researchers say. They found that narwhals released after entanglement in nets and outfitted with heart monitors performed a series of deep dives, swimming hard to escape, while their heart rates dropped to unexpectedly low levels of three to four beats per minute.


Revising the story of the dispersal of modern humans across Eurasia



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Most people are now familiar with the traditional 'Out of Africa' model: modern humans evolved in Africa and then dispersed across Asia and reached Australia in a single wave about 60,000 years ago. However, technological advances in DNA analysis and other fossil identification techniques, as well as an emphasis on multidisciplinary research, are revising this story. Recent discoveries show that humans left Africa multiple times prior to 60,000 years ago, and that they interbred with other hominins in many locations across Eurasia.


Crafty crows know what it takes to make a good tool



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Biologists have discovered how New Caledonian crows make one of their most sophisticated tool designs -- sticks with a neatly shaped hooked tip. New Caledonian crows are the only species besides humans known to manufacture hooked tools in the wild. The study reveals how crows manage to fashion particularly efficient tools, with well-defined 'deep' hooks.


Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Black holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype.


Researchers establish long-sought source of ocean methane



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


A significant amount of the methane naturally released into the atmosphere comes from the ocean. This has long puzzled scientists because there are no known methane-producing organisms near the ocean's surface. A team of researchers has made a discovery that could help to answer this 'ocean methane paradox.'


It's all in the ears: Inner ears of extinct sea monsters mirror those of today's animals



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


A new study has revealed that an extinct group of marine reptiles called sauropterygians evolved similar inner ear proportions to those of some modern day aquatic reptiles and mammals.


Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 08:49 AM PST


Scientists have developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.


Number of genetic markers linked to lifespan triples



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 08:48 AM PST


Researchers have studied 389,166 volunteers who gave DNA samples to the UK Biobank, US Health and Retirement Study and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In addition to confirming the eight genetic variants that had already been linked to longevity, this study found 17 more to expand the list of known variants affecting lifespan to 25 genes, with some sex-specific.


More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 07:25 AM PST


Classical scholars have discovered a large number of sealings in southeast Turkey. More than 1,000 sealings give new insights into the Greco-Roman pantheon. The finds were in a late antique building complex point to a hitherto unknown church.


New species of extinct marsupial lion discovered in Australia



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 04:37 PM PST


A team of Australian scientists has discovered a new species of marsupial lion which has been extinct for at least 19 million years. The findings are based on fossilized remains of the animal's skull, teeth, and humerus (upper arm bone) found in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of remote northwestern Queensland.


Traumatic brain injury causes intestinal damage, study shows



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 02:42 PM PST


A two-way link between traumatic brain injury and intestinal changes has been uncovered by research. These interactions may contribute to increased infections in these patients, and may also worsen chronic brain damage.


Separated since the dinosaurs, bamboo-eating lemurs, pandas share common gut microbes



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


A new study finds that bamboo lemurs, giant pandas and red pandas share 48 gut microbes in common -- despite the fact that they are separated by millions of years of evolution.


Viruses share genes with organisms across the tree of life, study finds



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


A new study finds that viruses share some genes exclusively with cells that are not their hosts. The study adds to the evidence that viruses swap genes with a variety of cellular organisms and are agents of diversity, researchers say.


New approach measures early human butchering practices



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 06:05 AM PST


Researchers have found that statistical methods and 3-D imaging can be used to accurately measure animal bone cut marks made by prehistoric human butchery, and to help answer pressing questions about human evolution.


Lemurs maintain gut health through 'huddling' together



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 06:19 AM PST


Scientists have found a direct link between physical contact and gut bacteria in red-bellied lemurs. Likely passed through 'huddling' behavior and touch, the new research has implications for human health.
You are subscribed to email updates from All Top News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categorieën: Wetenschap
Leeftijd: 14 t/m 18 jaar 19 t/m 30 jaar 31 t/m 64 jaar 65 jaar en ouder

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2017