ScienceDaily: Top Science News

Afgelopen vrijdag om 11:52


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Top Science News


Shocking study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activities
Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change
More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response
New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbons
Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?
Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds
Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells
Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
Breakthrough in understanding rare lightning-triggered gamma-rays
Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neurons
The ultrafast dance of liquid water
Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South
Critically endangered South American forests were planted by ancient peoples
Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???
Vast ionized hydrogen cloud in the Whirlpool Galaxy revealed by ultra-sensitive telescope


Shocking study shows one third of world's protected areas degraded by human activities



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


A shocking study confirms that one third of the world's protected areas -- an astonishing 2.3 million square miles or twice the size of the state of Alaska - are now under intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanization.


Limiting warming to 1.5 degree C would save majority of global species from climate change



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


New research finds that limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees C would save the majority of the world's plant and animal species from climate change. Species across the globe would benefit -- particularly those in Southern Africa, the Amazon, Europe and Australia. Examples of animals to benefit include the critically endangered black rhinoceros. Reducing the risk to insects is important because they are vital for 'ecosystem services' such as pollinating crops and being part of the food chain.


More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


Mosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system.


New catalyst upgrades greenhouse gas into renewable hydrocarbons



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:36 AM PDT


Engineers have designed a most efficient and stable process for converting climate-warming carbon dioxide into a key chemical building block for plastics -- all powered using renewable electricity.


Pesticides: What happens if we run out of options?



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:26 AM PDT


What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution.


Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:26 AM PDT


Researchers have completed the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia.


Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds



Posted: 17 May 2018 11:25 AM PDT


The world is a big place, but it's gotten smaller with the advent of technologies that put people from across the globe in the palm of one's hand. And as the world has shrunk, it has also demanded that things happen ever faster -- including the time it takes to charge an electronic device.


Robots grow mini-organs from human stem cells



Posted: 17 May 2018 09:33 AM PDT


A robotic system has been developed to automate the production of human mini-organs derived from stem cells. The ability to rapidly, mass produce organoids promises to expand the use of mini-organs in basic research and drug discovery. The system was tested in producing kidney organoids, including models of polycystic kidney disease. The robots were also programmed to analyze the organoids they produced.


Feeding habits of ancient elephants uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


A new study examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago.


Breakthrough in understanding rare lightning-triggered gamma-rays



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


The Telescope Array detected 10 bursts of downward terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) between 2014 and 2016, more events than have been observed in rest of the world combined. They are the first to detect downward TGFs at the beginning of cloud-to-ground lightning, and to show where they originated inside thunderstorms. The array is by far the only facility capable of documenting the full TGF 'footprint' on the ground.


Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neurons



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


The more intelligent a person, the fewer connections there are between the neurons in his cerebral cortex. This is the result of a study conducted by neuroscientists; the study was performed using a specific neuroimaging technique that provides insights into the wiring of the brain on a microstructural level.


The ultrafast dance of liquid water



Posted: 17 May 2018 07:22 AM PDT


Typically we consider that water molecules in the liquid state move randomly on ultrafast timescales due to thermal fluctuations. Now, scientists have discovered correlated motion in water dynamics on a sub-100 femtoseconds timescale. This appears as 'caging effects' due to buildup of tetrahedral structures upon supercooling. The results are based on a combination of experimental studies using x-ray lasers and theoretical simulations.


Major shift in marine life occurred 33 million years later in the South



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


A new study of marine fossils from Antarctica, Australia, New Zealand and South America reveals that one of the greatest changes to the evolution of life in our oceans occurred more recently in the Southern Hemisphere than previously thought.


Critically endangered South American forests were planted by ancient peoples



Posted: 17 May 2018 05:18 AM PDT


Critically endangered South American forests thought to be the result of climate change were actually spread by ancient communities, archaeologists have found.


Climate change in Quebec equals a much greater diversity of species???



Posted: 16 May 2018 02:22 PM PDT


A team of researchers believe that, paradoxically, climate change may result in Quebec's national and provincial parks becoming biodiversity refuges of continental importance as the variety of species present there increases. They calculated potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about one third of the protected areas in southern Quebec. Their results suggest that fifty -- eighty years from now (between 2071-2100) close to half of the protected regions of southern Quebec may see a species turnover of greater than 80 %.


Vast ionized hydrogen cloud in the Whirlpool Galaxy revealed by ultra-sensitive telescope



Posted: 16 May 2018 11:46 AM PDT


No one has ever seen what astronomers first observed using a refurbished 75-year-old telescope in the Arizona mountains. What it was turned out to be a massive cloud of ionized hydrogen gas spewed from a nearby galaxy and then essentially 'cooked' by radiation from the galaxy's central black hole.
You are subscribed to email updates from All Top News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categorieën: Wetenschap
Leeftijd: 14 t/m 18 jaar 19 t/m 30 jaar 31 t/m 64 jaar 65 jaar en ouder

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2018