ScienceDaily: Top Technology News

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ScienceDaily: Top Technology News


Device makes power conversion more efficient
Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go
The structure of cool: Researchers discover the unexpected atomic structure of cold and menthol sensor TRPM8
Brittle starfish shows how to make tough ceramics
Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool
Right-handed and left-handed molecules
New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings
Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damage
CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice
Hydropower dam energy without sacrificing Mekong food supply: New research offers solution
Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy
Galaxy growth in a massive halo in the first billion years of cosmic history
Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric
Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance
Security flaw found: 10 million banking app users at risk
A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotech
Physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste
Hydrogen gas from enzyme production
Flipping the electron spin
Smartphone health apps miss some daily activity of users
Cell tissue must not freeze!
Try this! Researchers devise better recommendation algorithm
Towards data storage at the single molecule level
Scientists explain Rudolph, Grinch, Scrooge


Device makes power conversion more efficient



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 12:45 PM PST


Researchers have presented a new design that, in tests, enabled gallium nitride power devices to handle voltages of 1,200 volts. That's already enough capacity for use in electric vehicles, but the researchers believe that further work can boost its capacity to the 3,300-to-5,000-volt range, to bring the efficiencies of gallium nitride to the power electronics in the electrical grid itself.


Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 12:45 PM PST


Engineers have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they're at home or on the go.


The structure of cool: Researchers discover the unexpected atomic structure of cold and menthol sensor TRPM8



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:18 AM PST


The first determination of the atomic structure of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), a molecular sensor in nerve ends that detects cold temperatures as well as menthol and other chemicals that induce cold sensations, has been made by scientists.


Brittle starfish shows how to make tough ceramics



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:18 AM PST


Nature inspires innovation. An international team of scientists has discovered how a brittle star can create material like tempered glass underwater. The findings may open new bio-inspired routes for toughening brittle ceramics in various applications that span from optical lenses to automotive turbochargers and even biomaterial implants.


Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:18 AM PST


Vast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests.


Right-handed and left-handed molecules



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


The subtle properties of mirror molecules have been revealed by a new study. The researchers examined camphor photoionization using an ultrafast laser. Circularly polarized light directed at camphor molecules allowed the measurement of electron emission, giving the first precise measurement of the asymmetry in the reaction of a camphor molecule. It confirms that more electrons are emitted in one direction, but also leads to the discovery that they are emitted seven attoseconds earlier than in the opposite.


New algorithm recognizes distinct dolphin clicks in underwater recordings



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Scientists have developed a new algorithm that can identify distinct dolphin click patterns among millions of clicks in recordings of wild dolphins. This approach could potentially help distinguish between dolphin species in the wild.


Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damage



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers are using adaptive optics (AO) to analyze retinal eye damage from the August solar eclipse on a cellular level. The research could help doctors develop a deeper understanding of this rare condition, called solar retinopathy, which has no currently accepted treatment.


CRISPR-Cas9 technique targeting epigenetics reverses disease in mice



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Scientists report a modified CRISPR-Cas9 technique that alters the activity, rather than the underlying sequence, of disease-associated genes. The researchers demonstrate that this technique can be used in mice to treat several different diseases.


Hydropower dam energy without sacrificing Mekong food supply: New research offers solution



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:17 AM PST


Nearly 100 hydropower dams are planned for construction along tributaries off the Mekong River's 2,700-mile stretch. In a new article, researchers present a mathematical formula to balance power generation needs with the needs of fisheries downstream.


Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:16 AM PST


Black holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype.


Galaxy growth in a massive halo in the first billion years of cosmic history



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 11:07 AM PST


Observations of two galaxies made with the National Science Foundation-funded Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope suggest that large galaxies formed faster than scientists had previously thought.


Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 08:49 AM PST


Scientists have developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics.


Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance



Posted: 07 Dec 2017 07:11 AM PST


Physicists compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR).


Security flaw found: 10 million banking app users at risk



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


Researchers have developed a tool to perform semi-automated security testing of mobile phone apps. After running the tool on a sample of 400 security critical apps, they were able to identify a critical vulnerability in banking apps.


A 100-fold leap to GigaDalton DNA nanotech



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 01:23 PM PST


A research team has leapfrogged their 'DNA bricks' technology by two orders of magnitude, enabling next-generation DNA bricks to self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures that are 100 times more complex than those created with existing methods. The study provides user-friendly computational tools to design DNA nanostructures with complex cavities (and possibly surfaces) that have the potential to serve as building components in numerous nanotechnological applications in medicine and engineering.


Physicists propose a new method for monitoring nuclear waste



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


New scientific findings suggest neutrino detectors may play an important role in ensuring better monitoring and safer storage of radioactive material in nuclear waste repository sites.


Hydrogen gas from enzyme production



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:25 AM PST


Researchers have uncovered a crucial reaction principle of hydrogen-producing enzymes. The scientists investigated the production of molecular hydrogen in single-cell green algae. They were able to demonstrate how the enzyme succeeds in transferring two electrons in succession to two hydrogen ions and thereby assume stable intermediate states.


Flipping the electron spin



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


When lithium-ion batteries are charged too quickly, metallic lithium gets deposited on the anodes. This reduces battery capacity and lifespan and can even destroy the batteries. Scientists have now presented a process that, for the first time ever, allows this so-called lithium plating process to be investigated directly. This puts new strategies for quick-charging strategies close at hand.


Smartphone health apps miss some daily activity of users



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


The iPhone's Health app and its built-in pedometer miss a significant number of users' steps during a typical day, a new study has found. That's good news for people who self-monitor their physical activity; they are probably getting more exercise than they realize. But the results should raise some caution among researchers who want to tap into the smartphone's enormous potential for gathering health data.


Cell tissue must not freeze!



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


Nature has evolved sugars, amino acids, and special antifreeze proteins as cryoprotectants. People use organic solvents and synthetic polymers as additives to prevent cell cultures from freezing damage. Now, scientists have combined both methods: They introduced polyproline, a polypeptide made of the natural amino acid proline, as an effective cryoprotectant for monolayers of cells.


Try this! Researchers devise better recommendation algorithm



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:24 AM PST


Most recommendation systems use a measure called cosine similarity, which seems to work well in practice. Last year, a team of researchers used a new theoretical framework to demonstrate why, indeed, cosine similarity yields such good results. Now they are reporting that they have used their framework to construct a new recommendation algorithm that should work better than those in use today, particularly when ratings data is "sparse" -- that is, when there is little overlap between the products reviewed and the ratings assigned by different customers.


Towards data storage at the single molecule level



Posted: 06 Dec 2017 09:19 AM PST


Similar to normal hard drives, so-called spin-crossover molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team has now managed to place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve its storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold.


Scientists explain Rudolph, Grinch, Scrooge



Posted: 05 Dec 2017 11:28 AM PST


A reindeer with a red glowing nose. A heart, two sizes two small, that suddenly grows three sizes. A trip to the past and to the future — all in one night. Researchers dug deep into their reserves of scientific expertise to explain how these inexplicable plot lines in holiday classics just might be (almost) possible.
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